Birding In Portugal is hosted at “Paradise in Portugal”, a small, family-owned, lakeside Lodge with an international reputation for good service, food and wine, and it’s from here that we regularly welcome birders from all over the globe to show them the stunning species we have in this part of the world.
With over 30 years of Guiding experience under our belts and with the luxury of returning to the Quinta’s warmth and ambiance every day, it’s no wonder many of our guests return again and again – and it’s also no wonder we’ve a 5 star rating on Tripadvisor amongst other awards.
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Monday
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Frank McClintock
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+351 283 933065
Locations
Description

Birding In Portugal is hosted at “Paradise in Portugal”, a small, family-owned, lakeside Lodge with an international reputation for good service, food and wine, and it’s from here that we regularly welcome birders from all over the globe to show them the stunning species we have in this part of the world. 
With over 30 years of Guiding experience under our belts and with the luxury of returning to the Lodge's’s warmth and ambiance every day, it’s no wonder many of our guests return again and again – and it’s also no wonder we’ve a 5 star rating on Tripadvisor amongst other awards.
Below are some of the outings we do and some of the species you’re likely to see. 

 

A brief description of the various Birding outings offered at the Lodge

Local Walks

Local Half-days can be to various sites or a combination of sites.

a)    Corte Brique Valley

This is a gentle walk of roughly 3 hrs duration on mostly flat, level land, taking us around a wide valley with mixed, low-intensity, self-sufficient farmsteads. It lies a ten-minute car journey from the Lodge.

 

b)    Water Rail and Kingfisher Hide

This Hide is normally an adjuncty to any of the other walks near the Lodge. It overlooks a pond through which a small stream runs. As the name suggests it is primarily a Hide for Common Kingfishers and Water Rails, the latter breeding right opposite the Hide itself in amongst a small patch of marsh, but we've also been lucky enough to see European Otters, Polecats and Egyptian Mongooses here as well as Southern, (or Southwestern), Water Voles, (Arvicola sapidus), a vulnerable IUCN Red Listed species that is considerably larger than the Eurasian, (or Northern), Water Vole, (Arvicola amphibious). It is also a good place to see any of the three species of Terrapin we have hereabouts, the European Pond Terrapin, (Emys orbicularis), the Mediterranean Pond Terrapin, (Mauremys leprosa), or the introduced Red-eared Terrapin, (Trachemys scripta).

 

c)    Bee-eater Valley

The name says it all. This valley is fifteen minutes from the Lodge and is one of the best places nearby where one can see this iconic species as it houses a breeding colony of approximately 50 pairs.

 

d)    Viaduct Valley

Viaduct Valley is also near Bee-eater Valley and we take a gentle walk bordering a small river with open terrain good for grassland species, as well as scrubland. It is more “open-to-the-sky” than the other local walks so one has more chance here of seeing raptors.

 

e)    Paul’s Valley

This valley is approximately half an hour’s drive away and once again is a gentle walk bordering a small stream. It is renowned for harbouring Crested Tits, Cirl Buntings, Firecrests, Short-toed treecreepers and Iberian Chiffchaffs, and is especially good for butterflies.

 

Full Days

The Plains

The day out on the Plains of the Alentejo takes us to a venue about 40 kms away as the crow flies in a north-easterly direction. Unfortunately we don’t have wings and to get around an arm of the lake we have to start our journey going in exactly the opposite direction, and thus we normally stop for breakfast after an hour’s journey followed by a further ten-minute drive before birding starts proper.  As with all nature in this area, the birds are adapted to making the most of the cool of the morning and the “action” takes place during the first five hours of daylight. To make the most of this vast area during this time it is imperative that we move on from any sightings as soon as possible. Many of the species in this area are threatened so please make sure you stay with your Guide and don’t wander off across the countryside. It is a legal necessity for us to have two very strict licenses in order to bird in this area and there are swathes of land across which we are forbidden to go, even if they are open to the general public, so I ask you to treat this area with respect and listen to any instructions given by your Guide. When outside of the car/van please don’t get carried away and stand in the middle of the road; the countryside here is under-populated and the inhabitants for the most part slow-moving, unlike the cars that travel along the usually empty roads.

 

Lagoa de Santo André

This brackish coastal lagoon is situated an hour and a half north of the Quinta and we have breakfast just before arriving there. It is a beautiful venue and we usually spend about three hours or so at this one spot before adjourning for a coffee stop. During these three hours, we take a gentle meander along a small length of the lagoon that takes us through some marsh grass before turning inland a short way to a small pine wood. Following our stop for coffee we turn south and travel down the coast, stopping here and there before finally heading due east to return to the Quinta.
 

Sagres and Foia

Foia is the highest point in southern Portugal at 902 mts, and we sometimes start the day right at the summit, so warm clothing is even more essential on this outing than normal. It lies an hour’s car journey due south of the Quinta and the journey there has 20 kms of switch-backs so car-sick prone guests are advised to grab a front seat. Once there we have an hour or so’s uneven walk through a scrubby habitat that attracts Dartford Warblers, Rock Buntings and Blue Rock Thrushes, before dropping down the other side of the mountain to a café and heading east to the coast and south down to Cape St Vincent and Sagres, the most south-westerly point of Europe.

 

The Ria Formosa, Faro

This day starts with a one and a half hour journey, towards the end of which we stop for a quick breakfast. After a spell in a hide we take a four km walk through the salt pans looking primarily for waders etc. If time permits, (not often!), we follow this with a visit to Salgados, a brackish lagoon near Albufeira before returning to the Quinta.

 

Here're some of the species you're likely to see ...

Latin

English

Notes

 

 

 

Tachybaptus ruficollis

Little Grebe

Resident throughout the year on the lake in front of the Quinta, but more visible during the winter. During other periods of the year one is more likely to find them on the Sado, the Plains or the Rio Formosa, where they are abundant.

Podiceps cristatus

Great Crested Grebe

Resident throughout the year on the lake in front of the Quinta, but more visible during the winter. During other periods of the year one is more likely to find them on the Sado, the Plains or the Rio Formosa, where they are abundant.

Podiceps nigricollis

Black-necked Grebe

A good spot, but regularly seen on the Sado or the Rio Formosa, especially during the winter and early spring.

Morus bassanus

Gannet

Seen on migration off the west coast.

Phalacrocorax carbo

Cormorant

A relatively common species, sometimes seen on the lake in front of the Quinta.

Phalacrocorax aristotelis

Shag

Rio Formosa, Sado and sometimes even on the Plains.

Ixobrychus minutus

Little Bittern

Relatively common species, (on the Rio Formosa especially),  between March and September

Nycticorax nycticorax

Night Heron

A difficult species to spot, but breeds and over-winters on the Paul de Boquilobo, north of Lisbon and also in the Algarve.

Ardeola ralloides

Squacco Heron

A nice species to spot, and sometimes surprisingly easy in the Algarve. Present March to September.

Bubulcus ibis

Cattle Egret

Abundant throughout the year, but best viewed in breeding plumage during April.

Egretta garzetta

Little Egret

Abundant throughout the year.

Egretta alba

Great White Egret

A rare species in Portugal, but records exist of a few every year on the Sado and the Plains of the Alentejo.

Ardea cinerea

Grey Heron

Resident throughout the year and breeds on the lake in front of the Quinta.

Ardea purpurea

Purple Heron

A beautiful species, rare but regularly seen on the Rio Formosa and the Sado between March and October.

Ciconia nigra

Black Stork

Rare but sometimes seen on the Plains.

Ciconia ciconia

White Stork

Abundant throughout the year, and a pair is nesting in Santa Clara across the lake from the Quinta.

Plegadis falcinellus

Glossy Ibis

Rare, but sometimes seen in the Rio Formosa.

Platalea leucorodia

Spoonbill

Regularly seen in small parties on the Rio Formosa, the Sado, the Plains and the Tagus.

Phoenicopterus ruber

Greater Flamingo

Increasingly common throughout southern Portugal.

Anas penelope

Wigeon

Over-winters on the Rio Formosa where the male’s melodious whistling is the sound of the time of year!

Anas strepera

Gadwall

Common throughout the year.

Anas acuta

Pintail

Commonly over-winters in the Algarve, on the Sado and the Tagus.

Anas crecca

Teal

Common during the winter throughout southern Portugal.

Anas platyrhynchos

Mallard

Common throughout southern Portugal throughout the year.

Anas clypeata

Shoveler

Relatively common throughout the year.

Netta rufina

Red-crested Pochard

A relatively common species in the Algarve and on the Plains if you know where to look.

Aythya ferina

Pochard

A common bird throughout the year in the Algarve.

Aythea fuligula

Tufted Duck

A rareish species confined to the winter.

Aythea nyroca

Ferruginous Duck

Rare but occasionally seen in the Algarve and on the Sado.

Oxyura leucocophala

White-headed Duck

Extremely rare, but has been seen on the Sado.

Melanita negra

Common Scoter

Over-winters between September to May off the west and south coasts.

Mergus serrator

Red-breasted Merganser

Over-winters in Portugal. A nice species to see, but difficult.

Pernis apivorus

Honey Buzzard

A difficult species to find, but has been seen in the Algarve as well as further north.

Elanus caeruleus

Black-winged Kite

A surprisingly common species for us, with 18 different individuals in one day as the highest record to date.

Milvus migrans

Black Kite

Regularly seen on the Plains from March through to September.

Milvus milvus

Red Kite

Often seen on the Plains and in recent years also further south.

Neophron percnopterus

Egyptian Vulture

A rare species though sometimes seen on the Plains.

Aegypius monachus

Black Vulture

A rare species though sometimes seen on the Plains.

Gyps fulvus

Griffon Vulture

Another rare species, though more regularly seen than either of the other two vultures.

Circaetus gallicus

Short-toed Eagle

Regularly seen near the Quinta as well as elsewhere.

Circus aeruginosus

Marsh Harrier

Regularly seen throughout southern Portugal.

Circus cyaneus

Hen Harrier

Over-winters on the Plains.

Circus pygargus

Montagu’s Harrier

A common sight on the Plains from early April through to October.

Accipiter gentilis

Goshawk

An uncommon though regularly seen species near the Quinta.

Accipiter nisus

Sparrowhawk

A relatively common species often seen in the garden at the Quinta.

Buteo buteo

Buzzard

Common, with a pair regularly nesting within a mile of the Quinta.

Aquila adalberti

Imperial Eagle

Extremely rare, though we did see one on the Plains in March 2000.

Aquila chrysaetos

Golden Eagle

A not uncommon species on the Plains.

Hieraaetus pennatus

Booted Eagle

Regularly seen on migration during late September as well as near the Quinta.

Hieraaetus fasciatus

Bonelli’s Eagle

A rare but regularly seen species both near the Quinta and on the Plains.

Falco naumanni

Lesser Kestrel

A rare species, (though expanding in recent years due to indefatigable work by the LPN), we see this most times we visit the Plains.

Falco tinnunculus

Kestrel

Common throughout Southern Portugal.

Pandion haliaetus

Osprey

Often seen in the winter on the lake in front of the Quinta.

Falco eleonorae

Eleonora’s Falcon

A rare visitor to the Quinta and the West coast, usually in the summer.

Falco columbarius

Merlin

Nowhere common, this species is sometimes seen during the winter.

Falco subbuteo

Hobby

Seen not infrequently at the Sado.

Falco peregrinus

Peregrine

Regularly seen near the Quinta where it helps to keep our Tumbling pigeon population within bounds.

Alectoris rufa

Red-legged Partridge

Regularly seen throughout southern Portugal.

Coturnix coturnix

Quail

More often heard than seen, though during April it seems to lose any fear of Man.

Porzana pusilla

Baillon’s Crake

Rarely seen, though can be found with difficulty near the coast.

Porzana parva

Little Crake

A very difficult species to see, but more common on the Tagus and the Sado than the Algarve.

Porzana porzana

Spotted Crake

Easier to find than the other Porzanas, though this is not saying much!

Rallus aquaticus

Water Rail

Seen regularly from the Water Rail hide near the Quinta.

Gallinula chloropus

Moorhen

Common throughout southern Portugal.

Porphyrio porphyrio

Purple Gallinule

Becoming more and more common on the Algarve, where more are lost to golf balls than predators.

Fulica atra

Coot

Common throughout southern Portugal.

Grus grus

Common Crane

Small groups are not hard to find during the winter.

Tetrax tetrax

Little Bustard

Relatively easy to find during the Spring, this is a difficult species during the rest of the year due to it gathering at those times into larger flocks. It displays late April.

Otis tarda

Great Bustard

One of southern Portugal’s flagship species, the best time to view is during the last week in March and the first two of April when its display is stunning. At this time of year over 100 birds during a morning is not uncommon.

Haematopus ostralegus

Oystercatcher

Over-winters along the coast, leaving our shores by early April.

Himantopus himantopus

Black-winged Stilt

A common species throughout the year, both inland and on the coast.

Recurvirostra avosetta

Avocet

A relatively common species in any of the salt pans.

Burhinus oedicnemus

Stone Curlew

By no means uncommon on the Plains.

Glareola pratincola

Collared Pratincole

A stunning bird, both in flight and stationary, they are not as uncommon as most people think, as long as one knows where to look. We usually find ours on the Plains.

Charadrius dubius

Little-ringed Plover

Breeding on the shoreline of the lake in front of the Quinta, this is a relatively easy bird to see during a stay at the Quinta anytime from April to October.

Charadrius hiaticula

Ringed Plover

Leaving our shores during April, it is a common bird during the winter on any of our coasts.

Charadrius alexandrinus

Kentish Plover

Common throughout the year, especially in the Algarve.

Pluvialis apricaria

Golden Plover

Gathers in flocks with the Lapwings on the Plains during the winter.

Pluvialis squatarola

Grey Plover

A regularly seen species during the winter in the Algarve, they leave us during April.

Vanellus vanellus

Lapwing

Dense flocks gather on the Plains throughout the winter.

Calidris alba

Sanderling

A common sight throughout the winter on any shore on the west coast, they are not infrequently seen singly in salt pans too.

Calidris canutus

Knot

An infrequently seen winter visitor.

Calidris ferruginea

Curlew Sandpiper

Sometimes seen during migration in April.

Calidris minuta

Little Stint

An infrequently seen winter visitor.

Calidris alpina

Dunlin

Seen throughout the winter, a flock in various stages of plumage change during April can be instructive.

Philomachus pugnax

Ruff

A few over-winter, but mostly seen on migration, usually on the Sado and in the Algarve.

Gallinago gallinago

Snipe

A not uncommon winter species on the coast.

Limosa limosa

Black-tailed Godwit

Often seen in the Algarve and also the Sado and Tagus estuaries.

 

 

 

Limosa lapponica

Bar-tailed Godwit

Often seen in the Algarve and also the Sado and Tagus estuaries.

Numenius phaeopus

Whimbrel

Often seen on migration both on the coast and further inland.

Numenius arquata

Curlew

An over-wintering species, mostly on the coast.

Tringa erythropus

Spotted Redshank

A striking species when in summer plumage on migration, though they also over-winter on the coast.

Tringa totanus

Redshank

Commonly seen during the winter.

Tringa nebularia

Greenshank

Commonly seen during the winter.

Tringa ochropus

Green Sandpiper

Often seen on the Plains.

Actitis hypoleucos

Common Sandpiper

Very common near the Quinta where it breeds on the shore of the lake.

Arenaria interpres

Turnstone

Regularly seen during the winter.

Larus fuscus

Lesser Blackback

Regularly seen.

Larus cachinnans

Yellow-legged Gull

Regularly seen.

Gelochelidon nilotica

Gull-billed Tern

Often seen on the lake in front of the Quinta as well as on the Plains.

Sterna caspia

Caspian Tern

Often seen on migration in the Algarve during April

Sterna sandvicensis

Sandwich Tern

Regularly seen on any coastal watch.

Sterna dougallii

Roseate Tern

An uncommon species though regular visitor during the winter.

Sterna hirundo

Common Tern

Regularly seen, usually during the winter.

Sterna albifrons

Little Tern

A common species on any estuary trip.

Chlidonias niger

Black Tern

Seen most years during migration in April, both on the lake in front of the Quinta and on the Plains.

Pterocles orientalis

Black-bellied Sandgrouse

A rare species, though regularly seen on the Plains if one starts early enough.

Columba livia

Rock Dove

A difficult species due to the abundance of feral pigeons, but one that is regularly seen.

Columba palumbus

Woodpigeon

A marked increase during recent years.

Streptopelia decaocto

Collared Dove

A rapidly increasing species both in the countryside and also urban environments.

Streptopelia turtur

Turtle Dove

A species that is under increasing pressure unfortunately, though good views are still enjoyed around the Quinta.

Clamator glandarius

Great Spotted Cuckoo

An early arrival and a species that seems to be increasing in numbers and range over recent years. Regularly seen on the Plains and also near the Quinta.

Cuculus canorus

Cuckoo

Arriving in mid March, this species can be easily seen during the Spring near the Quinta.

Tyto alba

Barn Owl

Relatively scarce though not rare species throughout southern Portugal.

Otus scops

Scops Owl

A pair has nested and raised young in the Quinta’s garden over the last four years, and their call is one of our dinner highlights during the Spring.

Bubo bubo

Eagle Owl

Rarely seen though sometimes heard, this species is easiest to find in river valleys on the Plains.

Athene noctua

Little Owl

A common species throughout southern Portugal, especially on the Plains, where they average 7 pairs per sq. km.

Strix aluco

Tawny Owl

A scarcely seen but regularly heard species around the Quinta.

Caprimulgus europaeus

Nightjar

This species arrives back with the start of the really warm weather in May, breeds near the Quinta and can often be seen and heard on the track nearby.

Caprimulgus ruficollis

Red-necked Nightjar

This species arrives back with the start of the really warm weather in May, breeds near the Quinta and can often be seen and heard on the track nearby.

Apus apus

Swift

Often seen near the Quinta from the end of march onwards.

Apus pallidus

Pallid Swift

Often seen near the Quinta from the end of march onwards.

Apus melba

Alpine Swift

Often seen near the Quinta from mid April onwards and sometimes in groups as high as 100+.

Alcedo atthis

Kingfisher

Regularly seen most mornings fishing from the pontoon in front of the Quinta.

Merops apiaster

Bee-eater

Probably the most accurate of any migrating species, it usually arrives within a day or two of the 1st April and leaves at the end of September. Approx 50 roost every evening in the eucalyptus tree in the garden.

Coracias garrulus

Roller

Arriving during the second half of April, these are a regular species seen on the Plains.

Upupa epops

Hoopoe

Regularly seen throughout southern Portugal and throughout the year, they are a delight to watch when catching Mole Crickets.

Picus sharpei

Iberian Green Woodpecker

Nesting within a km of the Quinta this is a species that is seen and heard most days throughout the year in the Quinta’s garden.

Dendrocopos major

Great Spotted Woodpecker

Nesting within a km of the Quinta this is a species that is seen and heard most days throughout the year in the Quinta’s garden.

Dendrocopos minor

Lesser Spotted Woodpecker

Seen in the Quinta’s garden this is a species that is often overlooked due to its size and quieter presence.

Jynx torquilla

Eurasian Wryneck

Wrynecks are resident around the Quinta throughout the year but can be very difficult to find, being more confiding further south.

Melanocorypha calandra

Callandra Lark

The Plains are the place to see this large lark, where in Winter they gather in to quite sizeable flocks while during the Spring and Summer they seem to be everywhere.

Calandrella brachydactyla

(Greater) Short-toed Lark

Common on the Plains and the west coast..

Calandrella rufescens

Lesser Short-toed lark

A difficult species to see, but sometimes spotted in the Algarve near the coast.

Galerida cristata

Crested lark

Probably our most abundant lark and seen every day near the Quinta.

Galerida teklae

Thekla Lark

Often seen on the Plains as well as near the Quinta.

Lullula arborea

Wood lark

A common species near the Quinta where their song in the early morning sometimes even drowns out the Nightingale’s.

Alauda arvensis

Skylark

Regularly seen within a few miles of the Quinta.

Riparia riparia

Sand Martin

A not uncommon species throughout southern Portugal.

Ptyonoprogne rupestris

Crag Martin

Regularly seen throughout the year in the hills to the south of the Quinta as well as on the Plains.

Hirundo rustica

Barn Swallow

Sometimes it seems as if they never leave us, with the last departures sometimes as late as December and the first arrivals in mid January. About 10 pairs nest on the Quinta.

Hirundo daurica

Red-rumped Swallow

An expanding species, and beautiful to watch. Our first pair nested on the Quinta during 2002.

Delichon urbica

House Martin

An urban species, with over 70 pairs nesting in Santa Clara, our nearest village.

Anthus campestris

Tawny Pipit

Regularly seen on the Plains.

Anthus trivialis

Tree Pipit

Regularly seen on the Plains and also near the Quinta.

Anthus pratensis

Meadow Pipit

A winter visitor, this species is common throughout southern Portugal during this period.

Motacilla flava

Yellow Wagtail

Regularly seen throughout southern Portugal

Motacilla cinerea

Grey Wagtail

A pair has nested in a recess of our well for the last five years.

Motacilla alba

Pied Wagtail

Seen throughout the year in the Quinta’s garden.

Prunella modularis

Dunnock

A species that is occasionally seen throughout the year at the Quinta.

Cercotrichas galactotes

Rufous Bushchat

A late arrival, this is a difficult species to find, but all the more exciting for the effort needed.

Erithacus rubecula

Robin

Extremely obvious throughout the winter in the Quinta’s garden, most individuals migrate north in the early Spring leaving it a scarce bird here by the end of April.

Luscinia megarhynchos

Nightingale

With the first arrivals usually getting to us in the third week of March, this species seems to have taken over the countryside near the Quinta within four weeks, with at least three males singing in the Quinta’s garden.

Luscinia svecica

Bluethroat

An irregular sight in the Algarve during the winter.

Phoenicurus ochruros

Black Redstart

A not uncommon sight along the west coast.

Saxicola rubetra

Whinchat

A winter visitor, most often seen on the Plains.

Saxicola torquata

Stonechat

Obvious and ubiquitous throughout southern Portugal throughout the year, they breed very early with the first fledglings appearing by the beginning of March.

Oenanthe hispanica

Black-eared Wheatear

Usually arriving during the second half of April, this species brings colour to any ploughed field on the plains for the rest of the summer.

Monticola saxatilis

Rock Thrush

A difficult bird to find unless one is prepared to travel, this species prefers higher ground than is usual around the Quinta.

Monticola solitarius

Blue Rock Thrush

A regularly seen species on the banks of the river Guadiana on the Plains.

Turdus merula

Blackbird

A ubiquitous species that has seen an increase in population and area during the last few years.

Turdus torquatus

Ring Ouzel

A difficult species to find this is sometimes seen in the hills to the south of the Quinta.

Turdus pilaris

Fieldfare

An infrequent winter visitor

Turdus iliacus

Redwing

An infrequent winter visitor

Turdus philomelos

Song Thrush

An over-wintering species.

Turdus viscivorus

Mistle Thrush

Our most common thrush, this is seen throughout the year.

Cettia cetti

Cetti’s Warbler

Its explosive song can be heard along any riverine habitat throughout southern Portugal.

Cisticola juncidis

Zitting Cisticola (Fan-tailed Warbler)

A ubiquitous species on any patch of grassland, (even in the middle of urban environments), we have many nesting within a km of the Quinta.

Acrocephalus scirpaceus

Reed Warbler

Tied to reed beds, this species can nevertheless be seen on the Plains as well as the Sado, Tagus and Rio Formosa.

Acrocephalus arundinaceus

Great Reed Warbler

Commonly found on the Plains, this species can often drown out even Coots and Moorhens.

Hippolais pallida

Olivaceous Warbler

A species that is sometimes seen in the Algarve.

Hippolais polyglotta

Mellodious Warbler

A common species in the riverine habitat surrounding the Quinta during the Spring and Summer.

Sylvia undata

Dartford Warbler

A fairly common species near the Quinta, nesting within 500 mts.

Sylvia conspicillata

Spectacled Warbler

Sometimes seen in the Algarve.

Sylvia cantillans

Subalpine Warbler

A common species nesting in the Quinta’s garden.

Sylvia melanocephala

Sardinian Warbler

A common species nesting in the Quinta’s garden.

Sylvia hortensis

Orphean Warbler

A difficult bird to find, being extremely shy.

Sylvia communis

Whitethroat

An uncommon species near the Quinta.

Sylvia atricapilla

Blackcap

A common species nesting in the Quinta’s garden.

Phylloscopus bonelli

Bonelli’s Warbler

A rare species in southern Portugal, though not unknown amongst the oak trees near the Quinta.

Phylloscopus brehmii

Iberian Chiffchaff

Commonly heard and seen near the Quinta.

Phylloscopus trochilus

Willow Warbler

Seen on passage, sometimes in the Quinta’s garden.

Regulus ignicapillus

Firecrest

A fairly common species, occurring even in the middle of Lisbon.

Muscicapa striata

Spotted Flycatcher

Often seen on our trips to the Algarve and also near Lisbon.

Ficedula hypoleuca

Pied Flycatcher

Regularly seen near the Quinta when on passage during April.

Aegithalos caudatus

Long-tailed Tit

Common throughout southern Portugal, and nests regularly in the Quinta’s garden.

Parus cristatus

Crested Tit

Relatively common, nesting near the Quinta.

Parus caeruleus

Blue Tit

Ubiquitous throughout the year.

Parus major

Great Tit

Ubiquitous throughout the year.

Parus ater

Coal Tit

Relatively common near Lisbon, though we have yet to see any near the Quinta or in the Algarve.

Sitta europaea

Nuthatch

Common in the oak trees near the Quinta.

Troglodytes troglodytes

Wren

Ubiquitous, nesting in the Quinta’s garden.

Certhia brachydactyla

Short-toed Treecreeper

Common and seemingly oblivious to Man, this species can bring great enjoyment due to its proximity.

Lanius excubitor

Southern Grey Shrike

Present throughout the year, and often seen sitting on the telephone wires near any road.

Lanius senator

Woodchat Shrike

Common throughout southern Portugal from April through to September.

Garrulus glandarius

Jay

Seen regularly in the Quinta’s garden, this species is the great “planter” of our cork oak forests nearby.

Cyanopica cyana

Azure-winged Magpie

Travelling the countryside in loose, noisy flocks, this species is common near the Quinta, apart from a couple of weeks in late April to early May when it is a secretive nester.

Corvus corone

Carrion Crow

Rarer than in other European countries, this is nevertheless nowhere uncommon.

Corvus corax

Raven

Seldom seen outside of a pair, this species is relatively common, especially on the Plains.

Oriolus oriolus

Golden Oriole

Returning to the Quinta around the second week of April, this is the real harbinger of Spring and its clear, fluty calls echoing up the valley nearby never cease to thrill.

Sturnus unicolor

Spotless Starling

Commonly seen throughout southern Portugal.

Passer domesticus

House Sparrow

Roosting in the Quinta’s garden, this species is a real sun-downer and riser making a racket out of all proportion to the size of the bird.

Passer hispaniolensis

Spanish Sparrow

Regularly seen on the Plains, Spanish Sparrows have benefited greatly from the recent surge in the White Stork population, whose nests are their preferred breeding site.

Passer montanus

Tree Sparrow

A difficult species to find, we nevertheless see them from time to time both on the Plains and in the Algarve.

Petronia petronia

Rock Sparrow

An extremely difficult bird to find, though occasionally found in mixed Sparrow flocks near the Quinta.

Estrilda astrild

Common Waxbill

This species is becoming more and more common as it continues to expand from its original base in the Algarve, being found now throughout southern Portugal.

Fringilla coelebs

Chaffinch

A ubiquitous species throughout southern Portugal, preferring mixed oak forests, it breeds in the Quinta’s garden.

Serinus serinus

Serin

Seemingly on the increase in recent years, we have at least two pairs now in the Quinta’s garden.

Carduelis chloris

Greenfinch

A ubiquitous species throughout southern Portugal, both in the country and urban environments.

Carduelis canabina

Linnet

Breeding near the Quinta, and seen most days throughout the year.

Carduelis carduelis

Goldfinch

With at least ten pairs nesting in the Quinta’s garden, one is seldom out of earshot of this species while staying here.

Emberiza cirlus

Cirl Bunting

A rareish species, seen more often than not on migration during April, this species can nevertheless be seen near the Quinta with a little effort.

Emberiza cia

Rock Bunting

Though nowhere common, this species is widespread and can often be encountered on the shore of the lake or in the Quinta’s garden.

Miliaria calandra

Corn Bunting

An easy bird to see and hear, one is often tempted to think that this species is abundant, though its continued reduction in more “advanced” farming nations renders it a useful yardstick with which to measure the health of our own countryside.

 

 

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