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Bradley Sorensen

Male. Lives in White Rock, NM, United States. Born on September 11, 1965. Married.
Bradley Sorensen
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Bradley Sorensen
Be the first person to like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Be the first person to like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Be the first person to like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Be the first person to like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Be the first person to like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Be the first person to like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Be the first person to like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Be the first person to like this.
Bradley Sorensen
This is for US users only. At some point Chirp will be migrating to Birda. The app is currently not available in the US region yet only Europe. This being said I signed up for the beta testing which r...View More
Bradley Sorensen
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Bradley Sorensen
7 people like this.
Bradley Sorensen
In open country of the west, the Western Kingbird is often seen perched on roadside fences and wires, flying out to snap up insects -- or to harass ravens, hawks, or other large birds that stray too close to the kingbird's nest. Spunky and adaptable, this flycatcher has adjusted well to advancing ci...View More
Bradley Sorensen
4 people like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Remarkably similar to the Eastern Meadowlark in colors and pattern, this bird is recognized by its very different song and callnotes. The two species of meadowlarks evidently can easily recognize their own kind the same way; even where their ranges overlap in the Midwest and Southwest, they almost n...View More
Bradley Sorensen
5 people like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Among our most familiar birds, Red-wings seem to sing their nasal songs in every marsh and wet field from coast to coast. They are notably bold, and several will often attack a larger bird, such as a hawk or crow, that flies over their nesting area. The red shoulder patches of the male, hidden under...View More
Bradley Sorensen
7 people like this.
Bradley Sorensen
This brown woodpecker flashes bright colors under the wings and tail when it flies. Its ringing calls and short bursts of drumming can be heard in spring almost throughout North America. Two very different-looking forms -- Yellow-shafted Flicker in the east and north, and Red-shafted Flicker in the ...View More
Bradley Sorensen
5 people like this.
Bradley Sorensen
Black-billed Magpies add much to western landscapes, both with their flashy appearance and with their big bushel-basket nests in trees. In an earlier era, farmers and ranchers tried to exterminate this species, but to no avail, and it is common today in open country and even in towns in the mountain...View More
Bradley Sorensen
6 people like this.
Bradley Sorensen
One of our most familiar birds in rural areas and semi-open country, this swallow is often seen skimming low over fields with a flowing, graceful flight. It seems to have adopted humans as neighbors, typically placing its nest in barns or garages, or under bridges or wharves; indeed, it is now rare ...View More
Bradley Sorensen
5 people like this.
Bradley Sorensen
One of the loudest and most colorful birds of eastern back yards and woodlots, the Blue Jay is unmistakable. Intelligent and adaptable, it may feed on almost anything, and it is quick to take advantage of bird feeders. Besides their raucous jay! jay! calls, Blue Jays make a variety of musical sounds...View More
Bradley Sorensen
3 people like this.
Bradley Sorensen
The smallest woodpecker in North America, common and widespread, although it avoids the arid southwest. In the east this is the most familiar member of the family, readily entering towns and city parks, coming to backyard bird feeders. Its small size makes it versatile, and it may forage on weed sta...View More
Rafael Belliard
I’ve heard this one quite a number of times in my area. Despite the ABA rules I prefer to have a second call to truly confirm if I don’t have a picture to go along with it.
Bradley Sorensen
2 people like this.
Bradley Sorensen
This big 'Honker' is among our best-known waterfowl. In many regions, flights of Canada Geese passing over in V-formation -- northbound in spring, southbound in fall -- are universally recognized as signs of the changing seasons. Once considered a symbol of wilderness, this goose has adapted well to...View More
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